Chat with us, powered by LiveChat
Get Help

Call the Lung Health Information Line

1-888-344-LUNG (5864)

Our certified respiratory
educators are ready to take your questions
(M-F 8:30am-4:30pm)

Français

Creating asthma friendly schools

RYAN’S LAW is new Ontario legislation that came into force in May 2015. It requires all school boards in the province to develop and maintain asthma policies and procedures that help protect students who have asthma. Schools will also be required to allow students with asthma to carry their emergency inhalers, with permission from a parent or guardian.

The Lung Association is committed to helping parents, teachers and school boards adjust to this new era of asthma-friendly schools.


FAQs for parents/guardians:

How will Ryan’s Law help to keep my child with asthma safe at school? What should I know about asthma? Find the answers here.

FAQs for teachers:

What should I do if a student is having difficulty breathing? How will I know which students have asthma? Find the answers here.


Managing Asthma in our Schools – a video for teachers

Download the video viewer guide


RESOURCES

For parents

  1. Individual Student Asthma Management Plan – English/French
  2. Asthma in Children – English/French
  3. Asthma Active – English/French
  4. Questions & Answers for Parents about Asthma – English/French
  5. How to Use a Metered Dose Inhaler – English/French
  6. How to Use a Metered Dose Inhaler and Spacer – English/French
  7. Taking Control (of Asthma) booklet – English/French
  8. Inhalation Device Videos – English/French

Click here for a complete list of our resources.

 

For teachers

  1. Managing Asthma Attacks posters – English/French
  2. Individual Student Asthma Management Plan – English/French
  3. Asthma in Children – English/French
  4. Asthma Active – English/French
  5. Questions & Answers for Parents about Asthma – English/French
  6. How to Use a Metered Dose Inhaler – English/French
  7. How to Use a Metered Dose Inhaler and Spacer – English/French
  8. Taking Control (of Asthma) booklet – English/French
  9. Video Viewer Guide – Managing Asthma in our Schools
  10. Inhalation Device Videos – English/French
  11. A powerpoint presentation “Asthma Friendly Schools” – English/French
  12. A Q & A for Teachers on frequently asked questions about asthma

Click here for a complete list of our resources.

 

For health-care providers

  1. Managing Asthma Attacks posters – English/French
  2. Individual Student Asthma Management Plan – English/French
  3. Asthma in Children – English/French
  4. Asthma Active – English/French
  5. Questions & Answers for Parents about Asthma – English/French
  6. How to Use a Metered Dose Inhaler – English/French
  7. How to Use a Metered Dose Inhaler and Spacer – English/French
  8. Taking Control – A Guide to Living with Asthma – English/French
  9. Video Viewer Guide – Managing Asthma in our Schools
  10. Inhalation Device Videos – English/French
  11. A powerpoint presentation “Asthma Friendly Schools” – English/French
  12. A Q & A for Teachers on frequently asked questions about asthma

Click here for a complete list of our resources.

Questions about your breathing?

To reach a certified respiratory educator, call The Lung Association Lung Health Information Line at 1-888-344-LUNG (5864).

Are you at risk? Take the Lung Health Check

THE LUNG HEALTH CHECK is a simple tool that will help you evaluate your family’s lung health. What are your lungs telling you? We encourage you not to ignore the symptoms that might be right under your nose. Discuss the results with your health-care provider!

FREE for kids 2 to 6 years old

front cover of Call me Brave Boy

CALL ME BRAVE BOY is a colourful 20 page picture book on childhood asthma designed for a parent or caregiver to read to a young child who has asthma. Children can follow along with the wonderful Michael Martchenko illustrations.

FREE for kids 7 to 10 years old

front cover of Asthma Active book

ASTHMA ACTIVE is a free book of puzzles, games and information to teach children how to control their asthma and stay active. It’s a great way to learn that having asthma doesn’t mean having to sit on the sidelines.